Locksmith New Port Richey

WHAT IS A MORTISE LOCK?


Mortise locks are not like standard bored cylinder lock, which have the lock cylinder installed inside the doorknob. Mortise locks have a lock body that houses all of the bolts and latches with holes cut into it for the cylinders, levers and spindles. The mortise lock’s cylinder has a cam that rotates to manipulate the handle or lever and retracts or extends the latch simultaneously.

The whole lock is assembled around the ”pocket” in the doorframe. The body of the lock is typically inserted into the door. Then the cylinder is threaded into the lock body through the door. The spindle is then fitted through the door and lock body and the doorknob or lever is threaded onto the spindle.

Mortise locks can be used in many types of doors either interior or exterior. They are often found on commercial buildings when the building owner requires a high degree of security as they locks can endure a high amount of abuse and are difficult to tamper with. It is a very durable lock.


Commercial grade locks are typically tougher and can withstand more use in high traffic areas such as hospitals, schools, apartment buildings, sporting arenas and industrial factories and buildings. Often they provide a greater level of security to protect business personnel and physical assets. Some are also fire rated to meet with strict building codes on commercial buildings.
Older and historic buildings often feature mortise locks because they can be “trimmed” with a wide variety of intricate architectural grade, solid-cast knobs, lever and strike plate designs that are not available in bored cylindrical locks.


Some of the biggest advantages of using a mortise lock include:

  • Mortise locks are fitted inside the door, making it difficult for someone to force the door open.
  • Since the locks has several latches, bolts and levers, it is difficult to pick the lock
  • These locks have a sliding bolt that requires the pins inside the lock to line up to release the bolt.
  • They can be master keyed
  • Normally these locks are UL fire-tested and rated
  • These are Grade 1 heavy duty locks
  • Mortise locks are available in Single Cylinder or Double Cylinder with or without a Deadbolt built into the lock.


The downside of a Mortise Lock is that it is typically more expensive than many other types of locks. Additionally, because it requires a precise fitting of the “pocket” and even the trim, it is not very suitable for a DIY installation. It requires some specialized equipment and tools that most homeowners or even handyman shops may not have readily available. For this type of lock, it is best to call a professional locksmith. A professional commercial locksmith will be familiar with these types of locks and have the tools and equipment to install and or repair them.

Mortise locks are not like standard bored cylinder lock, which have the lock cylinder installed inside the doorknob. Mortise locks have a lock body that houses all of the bolts and latches with holes cut into it for the cylinders, levers and spindles. The mortise lock’s cylinder has a cam that rotates to manipulate the handle or lever and retracts or extends the latch simultaneously.

The whole lock is assembled around the ”pocket” in the doorframe. The body of the lock is typically inserted into the door. Then the cylinder is threaded into the lock body through the door. The spindle is then fitted through the door and lock body and the doorknob or lever is threaded onto the spindle.

Mortise locks can be used in many types of doors either interior or exterior. They are often found on commercial buildings when the building owner requires a high degree of security as they locks can endure a high amount of abuse and are difficult to tamper with. It is a very durable lock.


Commercial grade locks are typically tougher and can withstand more use in high traffic areas such as hospitals, schools, apartment buildings, sporting arenas and industrial factories and buildings. Often they provide a greater level of security to protect business personnel and physical assets. Some are also fire rated to meet with strict building codes on commercial buildings.


Older and historic buildings often feature mortise locks because they can be “trimmed” with a wide variety of intricate architectural grade, solid-cast knobs, lever and strike plate designs that are not available in bored cylindrical locks.


Some of the biggest advantages of using a mortise lock include:

  • Mortise locks are fitted inside the door, making it difficult for someone to force the door open.
  • Since the locks has several latches, bolts and levers, it is difficult to pick the lock
  • These locks have a sliding bolt that requires the pins inside the lock to line up to release the bolt.
  • They can be master keyed
  • Usually, these locks are UL fire-tested and rated
  • These are Grade 1 heavy duty locks
  • Mortise locks are available in Single Cylinder or Double Cylinder with or without a Deadbolt built into the lock.   


The downside of a Mortise Lock is that it is typically more expensive than many other types of locks. Additionally, because it requires a precise fitting of the “pocket” and even the trim, it is not very suitable for a DIY installation. It requires some specialized equipment and tools that most homeowners or even handyman shops may not have readily available. For this type of lock, it is best to call a professional locksmith. A professional commercial locksmith will be familiar these types of locks and have the tools and equipment to install and or repair them.

Lady Locksmith Co​

There are numerous different types of locks available but not all locks are the same.  One of the oldest types of locks is the Mortise lock.
Mortise means “pocket”. This type of lock requires that a “pocket “ be cut into the door in order for the lock to be installed. Mortise locks are not standard locks that come pre-manufactured in a package. They are built and installed to fit precisely. 

 

 

 

 

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